MENA Region Has More Than 5.7 Gigawatts Solar In Pipeline

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Middle East and North Africa remains hotbed of solar power development with more than 5,700 megawatts of capacity under development.

The Middle East Solar Industry Association (MESIA) recently reported that eight countries in the region have more than 4,050 megawatts of solar photovoltaic power capacity under development. Adding concentration solar power capacity increases the pipeline to 5,700 megawatts.

MESIA notes that 885 megawatts capacity is currently operational across the region. 3,618 megawatts capacity is under construction. Projects being executed in Morocco, Egypt and United Arab Emirates  (UAE) likely contribute the most in this segment.

Morocco has several solar power projects operational at its Noor-Ouarzazate complex. In the UAE, 100 megawatts Shams-1 CSP project is operational and remains the largest project in the country. Construction on 200 megawatts solar PV capacity at Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park is at full swing while construction on another 800 megawatts at the same park is expected to begin soon. A 350 megawatts solar PV project was awarded in Abu Dhabi; the project will be expanded to 1,200 megawatts in the near future.

Construction of 1,800 megawatts solar PV capacity is underway at Aswan, Egypt. Agreements by several foreign companies have been signed already.

Jordan is seeing increased activity in the solar power market with several projects under construction. The government there is planning to launch more tenders soon.

Smaller countries like Oman and Kuwait are also planning large-scale solar power projects.

The new entrant in the region’s solar power market will be Saudi Arabia. The country has announced plans to issue tender for 300 megawatts of solar power capacity soon.

Originally published by CleanTechies.

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all investment matters ensures advice based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable investment advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialised units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Mohammad Mukhtar Mustafa,
Deputy Global Director, No. 4,
Strategic Business & Intelligence Division,
Email : deputy.gd.4@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1923
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

For Queries Specific to Middle East & North Africa :
Email : mena@cwiilgroup.com , hq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.com , www.cwiilgroup.eu

For Any / All Other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

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Could UAE Solar Push Lead A Trend For the Gulf?

As the Gulf states take steps to expand their use of clean energy, a bold plan by the United Arab Emirates to boost its use of renewable electricity from less than 1 percent to 24 percent in the next five years could be a game-changer for the region, experts say.

Much of the world is moving away from oil for its electricity generation, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA), which says that globally the fossil fuel has dropped from a 25 percent share to 3.6 percent over the last four decades.

Countries in the Middle East, however, have been bucking the trend. The IEA predicts that by 2019, the region – which holds one-third of the world’s proven crude oil reserves – will still be generating nearly one-third of its electricity from oil, with Kuwait and Saudi Arabia leading the way.

But dropping oil prices and growing concerns about climate change have exposed the downsides of relying on oil. As the Gulf’s demand for power continues to rise, the UAE is leading the way in shifting to greener energy resources.

“The implications of unmitigated climate change for the UAE make its cities unbearably hot, water even more scarce and the region more unstable,” Rachel Kyte, the CEO of the United Nations’ Sustainable Energy for All initiative, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

“Action alone and collectively to live in balance with the planet is fundamental for UAE’s future prosperity,” she said.

SOLAR GIANT?

At the Middle East and North Africa Renewable Energy Conference in Kuwait in April, the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) states – Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the UAE – pledged to mobilize $100 billion into renewable energy projects over the next 20 years.

One of the projects in the UAE’s renewables push is the $13.6 billion Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park in Dubai, which aims to become the biggest solar power plant in the Middle East.

It is expected to generate 5 gigawatts of electricity – enough to power 1.5 million homes – by 2030.

Dubai also plans to install around 100 electric car charging stations as part of its Green Charger Initiative.

By 2050, Dubai wants to reduce its carbon emissions by 6.5 million tons every year, with the aim of becoming the city with the world’s lowest carbon footprint, according to the Dubai Electricity and Water Authority.

Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia has said it wants to add another 9.5 GW of renewable energy capacity to its current capacity of 80 GW by 2030, and Oman’s power sector regulator, the Authority for Electricity Regulation Oman, has announced it will expand rooftop soar installations across residential homes, industrial and commercial buildings.

In Qatar, French energy giant Total SA has announced a joint venture worth $500 million with state-run petroleum, electricity and water companies to develop a solar-power project with a capacity of 1,000 megawatts (MW).

And with a 70 MW solar project due to be operational by 2017, Kuwait plans to meet 15 percent of its energy needs with renewables by 2030, according to the Kuwait Institute of Scientific Research.

“Diversification is key,” said Kyte. “The speed with which previously oil-dependent countries embrace diversification will be a factor in how well they thrive during the energy transition that is now underway.”

GROWING DEMAND FOR POWER

It won’t be easy for the Gulf to wean itself off of fossil fuels. In a report released earlier this month, the Arab Petroleum Investments Corporation, a multilateral development bank, said the Gulf Cooperation Council states need to add 69 GW of electrical production to their current total capacity of 148 GW in the next five years to meet demand.

Member states currently rely on hydrocarbon exports for 80 percent of their revenue. The global collapse in oil prices has rocked the region, which lost $287 billion in oil export income – almost 21 percent of GDP – in 2015, according to the International Monetary Fund.

But experts say the sunny region is in a prime position to use renewable energy – particularly solar power – both to meet its own energy needs and bring in much-needed revenue.

The region already has some of the infrastructure it needs to become a major clean-power hub. The Gulf Cooperation Council countries are linked by a 1,200-km electrical grid, built to help provide backup power in case of a blackout in one part of the system.

Expanded to other countries, that electricity highway could be the backbone of future power trading, experts say.

“The Gulf has an exportable resource in solar energy that could eventually be on a comparable level to oil and gas,” said Jonathan Walters, a former director at the World Bank.

“Low oil prices might impel Gulf countries to find alternative exports,” he said. And if prices rise again, domestic use of solar could soar, he said.

Experts said they hope the rest of the Gulf States will look to the UAE as an example of how to tap into clean energy’s potential.

“Low oil prices … and the need for clean air and secure supply chains of food and water all reinforce the wisdom of the UAE in taking a long-term view and moving to be a leader in renewable energy and energy productivity,” Kyte said.

“Now we hope the UAE can share its lessons in the GCC and across the developing world,” she said.

Originally published by Reuters – with credit to the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, climate change, women’s rights, trafficking and property rights. Visit news.trust.org/climate.

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all investment matters ensures advice based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable investment advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialised units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Mohammad Mukhtar Mustafa,
Deputy Global Director, No. 4,
Strategic Business & Intelligence Division,
Email : deputy.gd.4@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1923
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

For Queries Specific to Middle East & North Africa :
Email : mena@cwiilgroup.com , hq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.com , www.cwiilgroup.eu

For Any / All Other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

New Business Opportunities For Expanding in the Middle East – Specialized Advice From CWIIL Group

Many foreign entrepreneurs say that the Middle East is a “land of promise” for expatriates and even companies wishing to do business in the region. However, there are several drawbacks. Unlike Asian and European markets, it does not have a steady supply of trained manpower. The people are not industrious compared to other populations. Employees do not come cheap. Thus, entrepreneurial risks are greater.

The Middle East is composed of seven countries which are the top oil manufacturers in the world. However, it seems like the oil surge has made ordinary business standards look inappropriate. Too much wealth erased the need to obtain qualifications or craft smart business decisions. Yet, the economies of nations like the United Arab Emirates, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Iran, Kuwait, Qatar, Oman, and Yemen are booming. They offer numerous stimulating investment and trade prospects for investors and exporters.

According to a private research study, the Middle East affords potential investors with considerable growth prospects in the defence, maritime, automotive, energy, and chemical industries. Incidentally, statistics released by the International Monetary Fund through its World Economic Outlook Database disclosed that the export value of Middle East was roughly USS1.13 trillion by the end of 2012. This was approximately 6.2 percent of the total worth of global exports. The combined Gross Domestic Product of all Middle Eastern nations was about US $3.96 trillion during the same year.

Opportunities in Top Five Countries

Let us take a look at various investment opportunities in 18 Middle East countries that can help spur exports in the region:

Saudi Arabia is the biggest producer of crude oil worldwide. Despite this stature and riches, the government continues to encourage private sector expansion to reduce the nation’s reliance on oil and increase job opportunities for the country’s growing populace. The Saudi Arabian government offers multiple incentives to foreign investors. The top industry right now is Agriculture.

The climate and terrain does not support much food production. Therefore, most agricultural crops are still imported from neighbouring countries. The only produce that thrives despite the arid and hot weather includes barley, wheat and date palms. There is more demand than supply so you may want to start an enterprise that imports fresh produce from other countries. The other sector is real estate. There is increasing demand for residential units and other buildings as the economy and population keep on growing. The opportunities for property investors are simply overflowing.

The United Arab Emirates specifically the trade capital (Dubai) is a business core. It provides hassle-free access to consumer markets in other Middle East nations, Commonwealth of Independents States, Africa, West Asia, and Eastern Europe. Starting a business at the UAE is not difficult. The progressive administration maintains lenient policies and gives incentives for foreign entrepreneurs. Taxation is nearly non-existent except for tobacco processing, oil and banking. Besides, it formulated a long-term plan that concentrates on growing start-ups.

The foremost industry is construction. The UAE needs engineers and other professionals in the construction and building sector. You can also form businesses that produce or sell raw materials for these two industries. Oil and gas spearhead the country’s economy. There is sufficient room to take in new investors. One option is to begin your businesses from scratch or team up with existing ventures.

Kuwait used to have a law stipulating that any investor should have a local partner with a minimum of 51 percent business equity. However, the enactment of the Foreign Direct Investment Law (8/2001) led to more relaxed requirements. Foreign companies were allowed to incorporate even without a Kuwaiti partner. Foreigners are allowed to participate in industrial activities but not oil/gas exploration and production. So far, the recommended sectors are construction and infrastructure particularly in energy, communications and drainage systems. The other is information technology and development of software applications.

Bahrain boasts of a modern regulatory and legal structure, open border policy, infrastructure, and highly educated workforce. In short, the country has all the basics making it attractive to investors. The most ideal investment opportunity is the petroleum industry particularly processing and refining. A second alternative is transportation. Bahrain is an excellent location for shipping consignment in and out of the country. This is free of tax. It is a trans-shipment port which is the main reason for the presence of many businesses in the country.

Qatar is a relatively small country but the economy is very strong. Policies are also friendly to investors. The first opportunity you may want to put in resources is the manufacture and marketing of building materials for local consumption. This is lucrative since buildings are constructed every day. Information technology is a rewarding business because there is a scarcity of IT specialists in this country.

Prospects in Other Countries

Cyprus has evolved into a reliable global business hub particularly in the services sector. The shipping business can be a good choice because the country ranks among the foremost maritime nations worldwide. Cyprus merchant vessels represent 16 percent of the fleet with European Union flags. The banking industry is also flourishing with a broad range of local and global services like insurance, investments, mutual fund management, and asset administration.

The strict investment policies in Egypt have been relaxed. Businessmen looking at Egypt should consider the cluster of petroleum, energy generation and transmission, information technology, and telecommunications. On the other hand, tourism is the biggest earner in terms of foreign exchange and employs over 10 percent of the Egyptian workforce.

Iran has an abundance of business opportunities. With a population of 78 million and second biggest gas reserves in the world, this country is one of the first three consumers of Muslim food in the Middle East valued at 77 billion one year ago. Iran is also the second largest market for Muslim clothing.

Israel is another very small but highly developed nation. The Jewish nation has become very competitive in the information technology and pharmaceutical sectors.

Lebanon is the main trading partner of the United States, Italy, Germany, France, and China. Starting an enterprise is rather easy although corruption can be a problem. Nonetheless, opportunities are focused on the electricity sector as well as oil and gas exploration.

Business potentials in Northern Cyprus include retail, restaurants, water sports, construction, property management, and real estate.

It is necessary to undergo a long process and submit numerous requirements if you want to launch a business in Oman. However, the primary investment areas in the country consist of tourism, infrastructure and public utility services.

At the recent Palestine Investment Conference (2010), business leaders and private entrepreneurs met regarding potential businesses in the fields of tourism and manufacturing which are the top two. Other sectors were information and communications technology, housing, agribusiness, environment, and tourism.

Turkey has the 16th largest economy in the whole world and the sixth in Europe. The country has a high-growth market with construction and information technology as the top two profitable enterprises for foreigners.

Conclusion

Indeed, there are limitations for entrepreneurs who want to start a business anywhere in the Middle East. Political and economic transformations have opened and closed doors for businesses. Despite the risks, corporations, as well as small and medium enterprises, remain open to options.

These materials are not intended and should not be used as legal advice or other recommendation. If you need a legal opinion on a specific issue or factual situation, please contact a lawyer. Anyone using these materials should not rely on them as a substitute for legal advice.

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all matters relating to investment ensures advice based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable investment advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialized units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Mohammad Mukhtar Mustafa,
Deputy Global Director, No. 4,
Strategic Business & Intelligence Division,
Email : deputy.gd.4@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1923
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

For Queries Specific to Middle East & North Africa :
Email : mena@cwiilgroup.com , hq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.com , www.cwiilgroup.eu

For Any / All Other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

Cybercrime One of the Biggest Middle East Security Threats – Specialized Advice From CWIIL Group

While various pockets of the Middle East are constantly making headlines for terror threats, civil unrest and the persistent march of the Islamic State, there is a security threat that’s far more widespread, touching the majority of the region.

Experts are warning that the Middle East has become a hotbed for cyber crime. According to Cisco’s 2014 Annual Security Report, total global threats have reached their highest recorded level, increasing 14% from 2012 to last year. A sample of 30 of the world’s largest Fortune 500 companies generated visitor traffic to websites that host malware, with a sharp rise in malware attacks on the Middle East’s oil and gas sector.

The report also states that the Middle East and Africa region posts a strong adoption of smart devices, set to grow from 133 million this year to 598 million by 2018. In addition, current estimates value the Middle East Cyber Security sector at $25bn over the next 10 years.

However, that also means more complex security threats, and businesses across the region are at high risk, with 65% of employees not understanding the security risks of using personal devices in the workplace, Cisco’s recent Middle East ICT Security Study says. As a result, cyber-criminals are increasingly attacking Internet infrastructure, as opposed to individual computers or devices, which is why there has been a rise in password and credential theft, infiltrations, and breaching and stealing data.

Oil and Gas

Cyber attacks are increasingly becoming a cause for concern for oil and gas companies operating in the Middle East.

According to reports by Gulf News, Saudi Arabia’s national oil company Saudi Aramco was hit with a virus that infected roughly 30,000 of its machines in 2013. The report suggests that it took nearly two weeks for the company to recover, disrupting the world’s largest oil producer.

This is just one example of cyber attacks in the region, and the same malware, named Shamoon, was also used in an attack against Qatar’s RasGas, one of the largest liquefied natural gas producers, according to reports.

Several months after the attack, Saudi Aramco said the malware had tried to disrupt the company’s flow of oil and gas supplies to international markets and, by the company’s own estimates, resulting losses attributed to the attack were around $15 million.

Gulf News also reports that in October 2014 British defence and security firm BAE Systems released a military grade solution called IndustrialProtect, to safeguard industrial control systems. BAE Systems rolled out the product globally in October, and early indicators were that the organisation expected to cash in on companies in the Arab Gulf, Australasia and North America, according to company executives.

Gulf News quoted James Clark, Director of Energy & Utilities from BAE Systems Applied Intelligence as saying that “the threat is very real”.

It’s widely believed that cyber attacks in the Middle East are a mix of hacktivism, which is hacking used as a form of protest to promote political ends, and state-sponsored attacks. “We have economic war and information technology is one of the weapons,” Vincent Lavergne, Director, Field System Engineering for South Europe, Middle East and Africa, at F5, a company that provides data protection services to multinationals, told Gulf News.

Lavergne also said that one of the key issues oil and gas companies around the world are affected by is the fact that they primarily react to attacks – instead of being proactive. He said that companies can often be wary of high expenditure when it comes to risk mitigation.

Operation Cleaver

However, it’s not just companies based inside the Middle East that are at risk. Early in December 2014, The New York Times ran an article based on a report by Californian security firm Cylance which stated that Iranian hackers had been identified as the source of coordinated attacks against more than 50 targets in 16 countries – many of which were corporate and government entities that manage critical energy, transportation and medical services.

Cylance’s report opens with a clear statement, saying, “Since at least 2012, Iranian actors have directly attacked, established persistence in, and extracted highly sensitive materials from the networks of government agencies and major critical infrastructure companies in the following countries: Canada, China, England, France, Germany, India, Israel, Kuwait, Mexico, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, and the United States.”

Cylance titled this series of attacks as ‘Operation Cleaver’ as the word cleaver frequently appeared in the attackers’ malicious code.

The New York Times article was able to independently corroborate the firm’s findings with another security firm, Crowdstrike. According to the New York Times, Crowdstrike had been tracking the same group of Iranian hackers for the past nine months under a different alias.

The 86-page Cylance report directly identifies only one of Cleaver’s victims — a Navy-Marine Corps network in San Diego that connects sailors, Marines and civilians across the United States. However, it states that other victims in the United States included a major airline, a medical university, an energy company that specialises in natural gas production, an automobile manufacturer, a major military installation and a large military contractor.

The report also zones in on what it calls the “most bone-chilling evidence” – attacks on transportation networks, including airlines and airports in South Korea, Saudi Arabia and Pakistan. Researchers claim that they had found evidence that hackers had gained complete remote access to airport gates and security control systems, “potentially allowing them to spoof gate credentials”.
The New York Times coverage of this group concludes by highlighting that Iranian hackers are also believed to have been behind a series of denial-of-service attacks at American banks that have intermittently taken their banking sites offline.

You can read the full report on Operation Cleaver here

Let’s Talk About It

The region is not burying its head in the sand when it comes to the treat of cyber crime. On the contrary, the Middle East is leading the charge against cybercrime with a spate of dedicated events and investment aimed at generating discussion at the highest level on the best way to approach the issue.

Cyber Defence and Network Security UAE (CDANS) was held from 8 to 10 December 2014. The summit focussed on the increasing move towards the inclusion of big data analytics and cyber forensics in government cyber security in the UAE. The site for the event states that although “previously considered by some as the preserve of finance and manufacturing sectors, UAE security agencies and government organisations are moving beyond traditional purchases of cyber security software and systems towards analytical preventative and predictive measures as well as rapid response to create a holistic defence and preparedness programme”.

The event ties in with the UAE government’s doubling of cyber security spending to over $10Bn USD over the next five years and its goal of ensuring all services are e-enabled by 2015.

December 2014 also saw the Cyber Security Summit 2014 in Qatar. Endorsed by the Qatar Ministry of Defence, this event was billed as “the essential & confidential cyber security summit for Qatar and the Middle East”. The website for this summit outlines the fact that Qatar’s “growing international profile promoting greater awareness of the country’s wealth” has recently led to the country being a more attractive target for cyber-attacks.

Consequently, the Qatari government is investing in a comprehensive infrastructure programme in preparation for the FIFA World Cup in 2022 and security and fraud prevention measures are expected to figure strongly. In addition, the site states that “Qatar has already implemented a National Shield Project and its IT network of their Ministries and Government bodies will be completely secured by 2016 … Qatar now wishes to lead the way in developing and employing cyber protection and assert itself as a model for Cyber Security”.

Bahrain also held an event to address growing concerns about cyber security threats in October 2014. The Annual Cyber Security Summit was organised by business consultancy Roshcomm in partnership with Boeing International and Websense, under the patronage of Central Informatics Organisation information systems director general Sheikh Salman bin Mohammed Al Khalifa. This event featured workshops, master classes and presentations on the challenges posed by global cyber security threats as well as a ‘hacking challenge game’ or ‘hackathon’ to prove some of the concepts that were debated.

What Does the Law Say?

There are currently cyber crime laws at varying levels in several Middle East jurisdictions.

Late in 2012, the UAE updated its existing cyber crime law with a number of enhancements that addressed loopholes and corroborated that many ‘real world’ offences would also be criminal acts if they occurred electronically. As a result, the cyber crime legislation in the UAE is one of the most comprehensive in the region.

Of particular relevance to UAE-based companies is the new protection afforded to some personal information online. UAE law criminalises the disclosure of certain electronically stored information – including credit card and bank account details and electronic payment methods.

However, it remains to be seen how this law will be enforced in practice. In addition, while the criminalisation of such activities means that offenders could face prosecution, an affected business would still have to bring a civil action to recover any losses.

Elsewhere in the GCC, Bahrain and Qatar have draft laws on computer crimes under consideration while Saudi Arabia and Oman have cyber crimes legislation in place.

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution, particularly issues of security in any form. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all matters relating to security ranging from individual to national levels, ensures advice based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable security advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialized units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Mohammad Mukhtar Mustafa,
Deputy Global Director, No. 4,
Strategic Business & Intelligence Division,
Email : deputy.gd.4@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1923
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

For Queries Specific to Middle East & North Africa :
Email : mena@cwiilgroup.com , hq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.com , www.cwiilgroup.eu

For any / all other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.